TED PhD Researcher to Speak at Design + Research + Society

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TED PhD researcher Miriam Ribul has been selected to present her practice-based PhD research at the PhD By Design event at the Design + Research + Society (DRS) Conference this week. Miriam’s practice-based research is at the intersection of material science and design research. She is exploring how design can offer new insights for textiles when designers intervene with materials; not in their finished form, but in the science laboratory. The aim of this PhD research is to develop a design-led paradigm for textile manufacturing in the context of a 21st century circular economy.

 

Design + Research + Society (DRS) Conference runs on the 28th – 30th June at the University of Brighton. The event celebrates the Design Research Society in its 50th Anniversary year. In connection to the DRS conference, this event will explore what the future holds for design research and how this future is being enacted through practice-based PhD design projects right now. The main questions that the conference seek to explore are:

 

  • How do current PhDs in Design, frame and address the societal problems that face us?
  • In what ways are practice-based PhDs influencing ideas about Design and working as a designer?
  • How does current practice-based design research contribute to re-shaping our lives in more responsible, meaningful, and open ways?

Mindful Manufacturing Panel Discussion

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Last week TED’s Dr. Kate Goldsworthy spoke on the topic of ‘Emerging Technology and Sustainable Design & Manufacturing’ in the Mindful Manufacturing panel discussion hosted by the Lissome at The Hub Kings Cross. The debate focused on how we can enable manufacturing communities to foster sustainability practices in production. The event is part of the Threads – Rethinking Fashion series, which explores the topic of sustainability in the apparel industry and how to support innovations for a fair and sustainable supply chain. Other panelists included Rupa Ganguli from SPINNA Cycle, Katelyn Toth-Fejel from Hre Today Here Tomorrow and Daniel Harries from the London Cloth Company.

 

The series aims to guide the audience through a different stage of the supply chain each time – sourcing of raw materials, manufacturing, and consumption – to expose the issues related to each of them, explore possible solutions and highlight best practices.

 

The first event From fibre to fabrics took place in the beginning of the year and focused on sustainable sourcing practices to procure raw materials. The panel explored how to empower farming communities by enforcing sustainable agricultural practices in the sourcing of raw materials. The final event in the series Conscious consumerism will take place on the 20 September. This session will explore how to generate a sustainable demand and empower consumers to shift toward a more conscious consumption model. Topics will include recycling and upcycling, the circular economy and in general practices that enable consumers to reduce their consumption impact.

 

The series has been created by a partnership between Impact Hub King’s Cross, Ashoka Changemakers and The Lissome.

TED PhD researcher to Speak at TRAID Event

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On Thursday next week TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey will be speaking at the eighth #TRAIDtalks along with two other leading voices with unique viewpoints on repair in the community. She will be speaking on the landscape and politics of repair-making, from a material and social point of view.

 

The other speakers for the evening are Janet Gunter, co-founder of the Restart Project and blogger Jen Gale from My Make Do And Mend Life.  The three are part of a passionate network of active citizens making headway with the repair movement – sharing skills to benefit the community with an aim to tackle waste and counter over-consumption and working to inspire a repair revolution with wellbeing, skill-sharing, community and concern for the environment at the very root.  To revive the forgotten art of repairing things and improving relationships with ‘stuff’, this #TRAIDtalks will involve story-telling and sharing case studies to inspire positive change within communities.

 

TRAID is a fashion reuse charity working to stop clothes from being thrown away.  They turn clothes waste into funds and resources to reduce the environmental and social impacts of our textile use. You can support TRAID’s work by bringing a bag of your unwanted wearable clothes, shoes and accessories for reuse and reselling through their charity shops.

 

Spaces are limited so please book your  free ticket in advance to avoid disappointment. Suggested donation on the door: £5 to support Ziferblat, a shared community space in Old Street.

 

 

Date:
Thursday 23rd of June, 18.30-20.00

 

Location:
Ziferblat, First Floor
388 Old Street
London, EC1V 9LT

Chelsea College of Arts Undergraduate Summer Show 2016

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17 Jun – 25 Jun 2016

 

Catch the ‘up and coming’ artists and designers of tomorrow at the Chelsea College of Arts Undergraduate Summer Show, featuring work by graduating students from the following courses:

 

BA Fine Art

BA Graphic Design Communication

BA Interior & Spatial Design

FdA Interior Design

BA Textile Design

Graduate Diploma Fine Art

Graduate Diploma Interior Design

 

Private View: Friday 17th June 6pm – 9pm

 

Then open to general public:

 

Saturday 18th June – 11am – 5pm

Sunday 19th June – 11am – 5pm

Monday 20th June – 10am – 8pm

Tuesday 21st June – 10am – 8pm

Wednesday 22nd June – 10am – 8pm

Thursday 23rd June – 10am – 8pm

Friday 24th June – 10am – 8pm

Saturday 25th June – 11am – 5pm

 

Location:

Chelsea College of Arts

16 John Islip Street, London

SW1P 4JU

 

Sign up to our events mailing list to receive more information plus an invitation to the Private View.

Summer Institute at FIT

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Prof. Becky Earley will be a guest speaker at this year’s Summer Institute at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. Becky will speak about TED’s work within the Mistra Future Fashion project, which explores the possibility of designing textiles for different and specific lifespans within the circular economy. The talk ‘Designing for Circular Textile Speeds’ (Goldsworthy & Earley, 2016) will be will be accompanied by a ‘Circular Speeds’ workshop. The Summer Institute is a four-day conference for educators and professionals working in fashion and fashion-related areas. The conference consists of morning speakers and panels, with a key note given by Simone Cipriani of the Ethical Fashion Initiative, followed by hands on workshops in the afternoon.

For the full programme visit Summer Institute.

 

Materials! at WS04 Material Connexion Milano

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We’ve come back from WS04 in Milan with an overwhelming feeling that this can work.

 

This is a significant moment for Trash-2-Cash for a number of reasons: we’re almost one year in, we’ve just completed our first official sharing of written knowledge between disciplines (through 4 internal reports), Cycle A: Design has ended and Cycle B: Application has begun, but most importantly we’re really starting to understand one another and our different contributions to the project.

 

Not everything ‘worked’ at this workshop.  The methodology team has achieved a lot but we are still learning, the ‘design-driven’ approach is very new to all of us.  It’s trial and error; we use our experience and knowledge to plan appropriately, make on-the-spot changes, and introduce experimental tools as well as tried and tested ones.

 

So, as a testament to what we’ve achieved and how a project like this can work (with so many partners, with different backgrounds, languages, disciplines and cultures), we’re going to share some of the ‘tops’ (the best bits) reported by partners in Milan…

 

  • We loved using the materials samples to understand where we’re heading
    The venue for this workshop – Material Connexion Milano HQ – really allowed us to touch, to feel and discuss material properties.  One partner remarked that the location had provided an amazing ‘ambience’ for the workshop (and we could even work outside in the sunshine!)

 

  • We now understand the project ‘State of the Art’
    This has been difficult to achieve in the first year as results were still emerging and partners were still getting to grips with how their work aligned with everyone else’s.  It was the right time to dedicate some significant attention to Work Package presentations.

 

  • We can understand more about our business by hearing what challenges lie ahead for the material through the whole supply chain
    An incredible benefit of this project are the huge range of companies representing most of the material lifecycle and the great level of expertise that can be shared at each workshop – everyone is learning, even the most experienced people.

 

  • The different ways that the methodology team creates opportunities for cross-disciplinary discussions is fantastic
    Each activity is carefully designed to enable particular discussions and analysis to take place.  We reflect on the strengths and weaknesses and adapt our approach accordingly.

 

  • Learning about the fibre production process
    Fibre science and material production is really starting to make sense to designers which in turn opens up doors to creativity and will be an invaluable resource later in the project.

 

  • We are now starting to focus, connecting the dots and the details are emerging – “the project starts now!”
    After much hard work at the ‘fuzzy end’ of the process, partners are starting to see some clarity in what we want to achieve and how we are going to achieve it.

 

  • Cherries!
    In the true sharing spirit of the project, our Slovenian partner brought a gift of cherries.

 

We also had tips (things to improve) which clustered around the need for the science partners to share specific results in smaller groups and in person, not only on Skype… something we will think seriously about in our preparations for WS05 in Copenhagen.       

Adhocism Project Exhibition: Chelsea BA Textile Design Stage 2 PV Wednesday 18th May 2016

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An exciting an impressive collection of work from BA Stage 2 students was on show at Millbank in mid May.

 

‘Adhocism’, the concluding project from the Stage 2 Textile Design Programme, was a demonstration of energy, enthusiasm and curiosity that characterizes the best kind of work from designers today. For several weeks, students were encouraged to explore their personal interests within a broad framework of ideas that connects contemporary world concerns – economic, social and environmental, connected by their interpretation of the concept of ‘Adhocism’.

 

The students declared an appetite for thinking in ambitious, radical ways when members of the TED research group held a ‘brainstorm workshop’ early in the project. Students articulated their developing ideas and confirmed the diverse and dynamic directions they were taking the TEN strategies, which represent new areas of creative concern for the textile designers of the future. The exciting thing is that there is still a further year of study for the students to confirm and develop a personal position in relation to their wide definition of the subject.

 

A competition for design solutions was set by the TED team, demonstrating: ambition; skill; aesthetic judgment and personal interpretation of sustainability. Any selection of the work best capturing these qualities proved very difficult, as radical new ideas were demonstrated in all disciplines and inspiring design challenges were identified at all stages of the lifecycle.

 

Finally, a selection was made of 4 ‘commended’ students: Yee Nan Fong, James Frost, Zoe Hartington and Brian Lamb, while the top prize was unanimously awarded to Hannah Louise Robinson. The prizes, presented by Prof. Rebecca Earley, included a paid ‘internship’, enabling the winning student to work as part of the TED group – on live, ongoing, project material, prior to final year BA study.

 

 

Commended Students:

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James Frost: for the way in which he considered the subject of trainers as a vehicle for systemic change in the fashion industry. Their meaning in social, economic and environmental terms was well researched and presented. The entrepreneurial spirit James demonstrated in setting up a website to effect positive social change was highly commended.

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Yee Man Fung: for her connection between her textile practice and her ethical concerns about killing animals for food. Yee’s use of humour and inventiveness in setting out a knitted banquet with a correspondingly challenging menu was thought provoking and skillful in equal measure. The collection was commended for offering an aesthetic yet activist approach to her firmly held beliefs.

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Brian Lamb: whose work featured the production of a professionally presented development of modular structures in a dynamic video format. The design of a diagrammatic range of furniture proposed products for distributed manufacture, DIY consumer involvement and a possible context for woven textiles.  Brian’s use of the software promotes a convincing, next generation of product communication for designers.

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Zoe Hartington: for her creation of a huge vision by applying her skills to the urban environment.  Zoe transformed the urban landscape into a canvas for the application of beautiful, projected images. Her large format photographs captured Thames river views as virtual renditions of Venetian paintings. The presentation of such ambitious and compelling images demonstrated the transformative qualities of design thinking to problems of urban degeneration.

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Winner – Hannah Louise Robinson: for her original and impressive interpretation of the pressing environmental and economic problems caused by waste material. Her thorough and detailed research was evidence of a complete commitment to exhaustive investigation of the issues. Hannah’s application of an intelligent series of design decisions regarding re-crafting techniques, new industrial connections in production and application to a final ‘product’ was impressive – particularly as the product was the changed nature of the fabric itself. It achieved new value for the material and pointed towards transformative future product development.

 

Congratulations to all students and staff for the impressive demonstration of ambitious ideas, deep thinking, humour and skill.

 

The TED team
27th May 2016

 

 

T2C Weather Report: Preparations for Workshop 04 in Milan

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Workshop 04 (WS04) is almost upon us and Milan in May promises to be everything that Helsinki in March (WS03) was not: warm with a strong technical front moving in from the east.

 

In Helsinki we were treated to a plethora of design approaches to collaboratively add colour and context to our visions for the Trash-2-Cash (T2C) fibres.  We also saw, bubbling up on the horizon, a desire for the science and technology results and challenges to be more openly discussed, shared and addressed.  WS04 will therefore allow the technical partners the time and space necessary to get into the nitty gritty of issues like garment sourcing, fibre elongation and pretreatments… and for the designers this will be an opportunity to find out how ‘garment sourcing, fibre elongation and pretreatments’ actually affect the senso-aesthetic and performance potentials of the new T2C fibres.

 

I shudder at the thought of describing Design as the ‘weakening front’ in this weather analogy but a partial withdrawal is a necessary part of a balanced system, allowing the atmosphere to evolve before pushing back to challenge the technical direction.  In this way the role of Design in Milan will be to support the technical exchange and, perhaps for the first time, scientific and technological challenges can benefit from designerly approaches to problem solving.  The methodology team have designed activities to enable communication within disciplinary groups as well as between partners.  We will take workshop tools to help facilitate discussion, interpret ideas between disciplines, and identify the opportunities in seemingly impossible challenges.

 

WS04 is also a milestone in the T2C project as we bring together official internal insight reports (‘deliverables’ in EU speak) from four different disciplinary areas: marketing; science & technology; design and materials.  This ‘coming together’ of the different areas of project knowledge in a documentary form marks an important stage in the collaboration, taking it out of the messy brainstorm discursion of the workshop into something more considered and tangible.  Together these reports will help each person sitting in their own (disciplinary and geographical) climate to build a more complete picture of the kinds of fibres we plan to develop.  Not all of it will make sense to everyone.  And that’s the other agenda for WS04; to make it make sense, to elucidate the picture that has begun to be pieced together individually and make it vivid in collaboration; a forecast map taking into account all of the different perspectives.

 

When we return on May 27th, back in our own offices, studios and labs, we will all have a clearer picture of the design and technical ‘outlook’ for T2C fibres, and be able to begin work on developing new prototypes in earnest.

TED’s Research Assistant Featured in Today’s Metro

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The work of TED’s Research Assistant Josefin Landalv is featured in today’s Metro. The article presents graduates and students who have been selected to exhibit for UAL Now at the Pulse tradeshow. This featured stand will be presented in Launchpad, Pulse’s creative hub of fresh design talent, and will showcase fourteen new design businesses from University of the Arts students and alumni.

Josefin will be exhibiting her latest work the Lysande lampshade collection which is hand woven from Finnish paper yarn, and minimises environmental impact at all stages of production. The collection is inspired by the natural ridged characteristics of the origin of the material itself – the tree, along with minimalist Scandinavian influences and colourful Senegalese vibrancies.

Josefin graduated from Chelsea College of Arts with a BA in Textile Design in 2011, supported by the Swedish Textile Scholarship Funds (TEKO). In 2014 Josefin received the Cockpit Arts/ Clothworkers’ Foundation Award which recognises entrepreneurial spirit, creative excellence and craft skills. She works part time in TED on practice and theory projects with students and staff.

Pulse is taking place at Olympia London on the 15th – 17th of May.

Photography Alun Callender

Blue Jumper

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TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey is exhibiting her Blue Jumper (2012) in an exhibition of “thoughtfully mended textiles” called …by a thread… at Gawthorpe Hall, until 19th June 2016.

The exhibition aims to explore ideas around mending, after a year of building renovation and repair at the hall itself. From the curator:

“While the stonework within the Hall was being mended – quite invisibly – we became interested in repair which did the opposite. We started looking for examples of mending which were visible and actually made a feature of wear and tear. We discovered that with textile items, repair can be storytelling, creative and commemorative. It can add something extra and bring new meaning and emotion to an object. It can tell us more about people, history, memories and lives.”

The artefacts exhibited in …by a thread… all display thoughtful and careful repairs, and include Karen Suzuki’s rescued teddy, Jacy Wall’s Japanase boro jacket, David Worsley’s darned jeans, Angela Maddock’s repaired Wrangler jacket and Jenni Steele’s 1930s nurse’s apron, along with Claire Wellesley-Smith’s Japanese boro bloomers and Coreen Cottam’s family quilt. Each comes with a story written by the lender, explaining why the process and act of repair is significant to them.

About Blue Jumper

‘I consider Blue Jumper, a heavily darned navy blue jumper, to be a performative artwork that I wear and work on. I found it in pristine condition, in a charity shop off Old Street, London, now Blue Jumper is heavily darned yet still worn. As environmentalist I am anti-waste, and I wear only second-hand wool. When moths ate Blue Jumper, I continued wearing it.

This garment can be considered disobedient, and it certainly has a disobedient wearer. My stitched intervention displays my politics: my slogan not shouted but darned. Blue Jumper is personal, political, active and rebellious.

I find myself resilient against pressure to buy new: I can, I will, I am, through choice and necessity, wearing, repairing and re-wearing. In celebration of resistance and autonomy, like Plutarch’s Ship of Theseus, I will keep repairing Blue Jumper until all is repair, and beyond.’