Meet Circular Transitions Keynote Speaker Cyndi Rhoades

 

Future 500

Cyndi is the founder/CEO of Worn Again and has led the business from its early ‘upcycling’ days to its’ focus as a technology innovation company.

With a vision to eradicate textile waste, she has worked on a series of ground-breaking products and projects with world leading designers and global brands, including Virgin Atlantic, Eurostar, Virgin Balloon Flights, M&S and most recently, a collaboration with H&M and Kering’s Sports and Lifestyles brand, Puma.

In addition to circular economies Cyndi is also passionate about canal boating & car boot sales.

 

What are you working on at the moment?
We are in development of a textile to textile recycling technology that can recapture polyester and cotton from end of use textiles to be reintroduced into the beginning of the supply chain as new. The technology will provide a crucial enabler for the industry to transition to a circular resource model.

 

What will you share at the conference that people haven’t heard before?
I’ll be talking about how a new generation of technologies achieve the biggest technological advance the industry has seen since the Industrial Revolution.

 

Follow Cindy at Twitter @cyndirhoades 

New Trash-2-Cash Podcast – Meet Tina

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In this new podcast, Trash-2-Cash Researcher Tina Mueller of Copenhagen Business School explains why the Intention-Behavior gap is important in understanding consumer perceptions of recycled goods. To learn more about social marketing and sustainability research from the customer’s perspective, go to iTunes or SoundCloud to listen. Don’t forget to subscribe so you receive all new episodes automatically!

Join in and listen to H&M’s Circular Lab Livestream Debate

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April 14th, 10.00am – approx. 12.00

 

TED’s researchers Becky Earley and Kate Goldsworthy will be part of the H&M Circular Lab event this week in London. Reader of Circular Design Dr. Kate Goldsworthy will lead a break out session on A holistic approach to circularity and the need for circular design during H&M’s Circular Lab Livestream Debate this week.

 

The event will discuss the transition from a linear to a circular business model, which is one of the key challenges for the fashion industry. H&M will be sharing some of their experiences so far and release first new ambitions. H&M started their journey a few years ago with setting up a worldwide garment collecting system. Since then, they launched the first collection made of recycled material created from such collected clothes. However, much more innovation will be needed to create full circularity. H&M has invited inspiring and industry leading key note speakers and an insightful panel to discuss the next steps towards a circular future, not only for H&M but the entire fashion industry.

 

Join the debate on the 14th April at 10am via the H&M 100% Circular Lab livestream link, and bring your questions into the panel debate via twitter #HMlab

 

Key note speakers:

  • Karl-Johan Persson, CEO, H&M
  • Anna Gedda, Head of Sustainability, H&M
  • Ellen MacArthur, World record sailor and founder of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation

 

Panel:

  • Ellen MacArthur, World record sailor and founder of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation
  • Akshay Sethi, Inventor of the “Polyester Digester”, Ambercycle
  • Michael Arnör, Co-Founder and CEO of Sellpy
  • Anna Gedda, Head of Sustainability at H&M

Making Circular Transitions by Professor Becky Earley

Being interviewed at the Awards ceremony wearing my 2012 Margiela for H&M dress with a beautiful beaded handmade butterfly necklace borrowed from Clara Francis Jewellery
Being interviewed at the Awards ceremony wearing my 2012 Margiela for H&M dress with a beautiful beaded handmade butterfly necklace borrowed from Clara Francis Jewellery

2016 began with a quiet January at home, thinking about fashion textiles and circles, cycles, loops and spirals. It’s all happening with the circular economy right now – and whilst this has been building for an awfully long time, it finally feels as if some real changes are about to take place. It also feels like a lot of different projects are finally coming together…

 

Towards Global Change

Since last summer I have been on the judging panel for the H&M Conscious Foundation Global Change Awards. Just before I went to India I submitted my final selection of five winners, and was so pleased to see that when I got back 4 out of the 5 right had made it into the final line up! The winners spanned new fibres – made from paper, textile and citrus fruit waste, as well as algae – and microbes that eat polyester enabling new yarn to be created. There was also a concept for an online platform that connected textile waste from industry to potential users. (This was my favourite – it’s too easy to forget that we need more systems designed to aid the flow of existing resources, as well as the invention of new materials).

The award ceremony was a two-day extravaganza in Stockholm, with event at KTH and the Town Hall. The stair case that the winners came down is the one that the Nobel Prize winners come down. They were a great group of entrepreneurs – it was so exciting to see their ideas get this attention and support.

The keynote speaker for the award ceremony was David Roberts, from Singularity University (also a decorated Special Agent). I have great reservations about the massive investment in technology that goes across around the world, when problems seem to be so much about people, politics and broken systems. But his talk was really enlightening – I was thrilled to hear about exponential growth and technologies coming online, especially the projections he showed around solar power. (He succinctly explained the dip we experience early on with new technologies, where after an initial excitement we begin to doubt them). He brings the talk to a conclusion by showing us two animal films from You Tube, which echo his points about human nature. By joining together in collective action we are strong enough to remove danger from our community. (Oh, and, cat’s are mean…) I am not how well he relates exponential growth and the power of the bystander – it seems to hang in the air at the end. But watch the talk here and decide for yourself.

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The judging panel in conversation on stage at Stockholm City Hall, from left: Ellis Rubenstein, CEO of New York Academy of Sciences; Amber Valetta, entrepreneur and activist; Professor Michael Braungart, co-author of Cradle-to-Cradle; Professor Johan Rockstrom, Stockholm Resilience Centre; and me…

Meeting the other judges and Jo Confino (ex Guardian now Huffington Post) was super interesting. I enjoyed the company and conversation of Ellis Rubenstein from NYAS very much. Also Michael Braungart (C2C) and Friederike von Wedel-Parlow (ESMOD), and the great dinner chat whilst seated next to Karl-Johan Persson. I nipped out between the seven vegetarian courses to record this little podcast… with Natalia. (I come in after 23 minutes.)

Can’t finish this report without highlighting the overall winners – by public vote – our Trash 2 Cash collaborators, VTT! Congratulations to them for putting their ideas out there to multiple funders and really pushing their material innovations.

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Watch the winners interviews here

 

Fast Talking, Hybrid Style

Before all the excitement with the awards kicked off I gave a short 8-minute pitch at Mode Hybrid, Hybrid Talks. Hosted by Mistra Future Fashion, Misum, and Stockholm School of Economics, these micro talks focus on the collaborative potential of ‘science fiction, to science fact to science fabulous‘! (To quote the dynamic founder of Hybrid, Annika Shelley!)

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Hybrid Talking with Martin Johnson (left), Eduardo Escobedo, Susy Paisley and Annika Shelley

As Hybrid drinks came to an end I did this TV interview. Fashionomics 2 was a conversation around sustainability hosted by Ulf Skarin, Creative Director at the Veckans Affärer and Elin Frendberg, CEO of the Swedish Fashion Council with Eduardo Escobedo, Founder of the RESP – an organisation that brings together luxury brands and sustainability, and Annika Shelly, Founder of Hybrid Talks.

 

Stockholm Shirts: Making Change

When not TALKING, I am happy to be quietly thinking, making and writing. Whilst I love to talk (I think you realise that after the above!) the pleasure of silently making is essential to thinking clearly. Without making things, and writing ideas down, the whole process just isn’t complete. Whilst I used to rely on making alone to research ideas, I am now fully signed up to the rich experience of being an academic who uses many forms of exploration. It’s not just making, writing and presenting/talking. It’s also exhibition curation and film/animation script writing. When these approaches all work together, I find myself more able to deal with the complexity of sustainability, and hold on to the pleasure of creativity, whilst also finding ways to build communities and audiences.

For this Stockholm trip, I took a day to work into some second hand H&M shirts I had collected from Sweden. I used an old lace dress I found in Anxi Clothing Market in Shanghai in 2013, to create a heat photogram image on the polyester shirts. The mix of Chinese clothing and H&M product enabled me to think more about the disconnect between fashion textile designers and consumers and the industrial manufacturing processes inherent in speedy clothing lines. I am not unaware of H&M production being amongst the fastest in the world – I have questioned them about this myself. They believe in working in emerging economies to contribute to growth there with their business, and to do that in the best ways possible. They argue if they weren’t producing there, things would be much worse for the local economies and lifestyles.

The Stockholm Shirts are about continuing to think about how big business can use textile design approaches to create sustainable social innovation production models.

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Making the print template for the Stockholm Shirts from a Chinese lace dress found in Shanghai

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Stockholm Shirts, February 2016

 

Circular Transitions Conference

Finally, for this first post of 2016, I want to flag up our our Mistra Future Fashion Circular Transitions conference in November 2016, at Tate Britain. It has been years in the planning, so we are excited to have the chance to get the world’s design researchers together for two days to fully explore fashion textile design and the emerging circular economy. Abstracts are due in to us by 25th March 2016, so get your ideas together and come and join us for what promises to be a really valuable experience for a wide range of stakeholders – you, the trustees of the future of design and circular fashion textiles…

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www.circulartransitions.org

Trash-2-Cash Workshop #02

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Last week representatives from each of the partners travelled to Prato, Florence for Workshop #02 of the Trash-2-Cash project. Although the partners have met before, this was a particularly exciting moment in the project as the designers, materials scientists and manufacturers pooled their knowledge and capabilities to in an attempt to innovatively transform waste textiles into a cellulosic (CES) and a polymer (PES) fibre for the first time.

The workshop was generously hosted in style by Enrico Cozzoni (Grado Zero) and included a tour of the Textile Museum location, in Prato. The aim was to identify materials characteristics for the new fibres; for design and market insights to challenge materials R&D.

The workshop began with a materials showcase session which was energetically facilitated by Christian Tubito of Materials ConneXion Italia and supported by Becky Earley from University of the Arts London, Kirsi Niinimäki and Sari Berglund from Aalto Arts, Finland. Each partner brought with them a material sample to begin the discussion around potentialities both of the partner engagements and of the materials research. Large posters enabled the participants to begin to build a picture of the key benefits and limitations of existing CES and PES materials in knitted, woven and non-woven forms. A ‘wish list’ of fibre/material characteristics as well as potential applications were identified.

The real triumph of Workshop #02 was that we caught a glimpses of future scenarios for these new ‘super-fibres’; a picture emerged of how these new materials might ‘look’ in the context of peoples’ lives and lifestyles… the most exciting part is that this was materials- AND design- led, and couldn’t have happened without all of the expertise present at Prato.

Trash-2-Cash: Utilising zero-value waste textiles and fibres with design-driven technologies to create high quality products


14th November 2015

TED have been busy over the summer kicking off Trash-2-Cash, our new EU funded research project. Professor Rebecca Earley and Dr Kate Goldsworthy are collaborating with eighteen partners from nine European countries, and together they aim to design high-quality products from zero-value waste textiles and fibres via design driven technologies. In other words, turn textile and paper waste into desirable luxury products.

Designing for cyclability is the TED ethos, manifested in the belief that design-driven innovation can support better waste utilisation and contribute to reduction of landfill area needs. There are growing problems with paper fibre waste from the paper industry and textile fibre waste, originating from continuously increasing textile consumption. Trash-2-Cash recognises the critical need to address this problem head-on by working with a unique multidisciplinary team of designers, scientists, researchers, manufacturers and SMEs (small/medium enterprises).

Designers will drive this recycling initiative, defining the material properties and working with a range of scientists to develop eco-efficient cotton fibre regeneration and polyester recycling techniques.

This is a three-year initiative that aims to lead the future of design for recycled materials and significantly contribute to the overall vision of closing the material loop.

Follow the Trash-2-Cash developments on our Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, and our website is coming soon!

Written by Gabrielle Miller