TED Textile Toolbox workshop at Norwich University of the Arts

Helen Paine recently completed her PhD at Royal College of Art and is associated to TED via her PhD supervisor, Dr Kate Goldsworthy. This month Helen used TED’s TEN and the Textile Toolbox web platform to structure a future materials workshop for a group of 2nd and 3rd year Textiles students at Norwich University of the Arts. The session began with a short lecture that introduced TED’s research, their TEN sustainable research strategies and Textile-Toolbox pop-up exhibits. After this initial introduction, students were asked to reflect on their own practice and consider how they might develop a favourite sample from a previous project with reference to TED’s TEN. They worked together as a group to discuss ideas, which informed the development of their own sustainable manifestos. Each student presented their manifesto back to the group at the end of the morning session. There were some great ideas on ways of making their practice more sustainable, such as using dry processing methods to reduce water waste; substituting materials to maintain mono-materiality for closed-loop recycling; and building the consumer into their design process to reduce the need to consume.

BA Textiles students at Norwich University of the Arts developing sustainable manifestos for their work using TEDs TEN

Students took a more practical approach in the afternoon session to learn about the work of TED and performed Becky Earley’s Fast Refashion technique on a used polyester shirt. Helen wore a shirt that she had already transformed using the technique to inspire students and give them some ideas for their own designs. Stencils were cut from heat-transfer papers and applied directly to the surface of the shirt using a heat press. Through this exercise students were introduced to a quick and simple way of refashioning mono-material polyester clothing and were able to give their clothing a new lease of life for prolonged wear. Some of the students loved their transformed shirts so much that they wore them home from the session. Thanks TED for a great Toolbox of inspirational ideas!


BA Textiles students at Norwich University of the Arts performing Becky Earley’s Fast-Refashion technique on used polyester clothing

Social Innovation in Fashion

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5th– 7th September

 

One of our current PhD researchers Emmeline Child has just presented at the International Conference for Social Innovation ISIRC2016 in Glasgow. Here she was presenting how her methods in fashion design, have led to Social Innovation in the Industry. Emmeline was drawing from her experience as a practitioner and through her PhD research, which is looking to develop design led models that can be implemented to increase levels of upcycling within the fashion industry.

 

Presenting in a predominantly business and management based environment places our fashion and textile design research at the forefront of this changing global market.  Showcasing these ‘design thinking’ strategies demonstrates how beneficial the work of designers and practitioners can be in the workplace today.

 

Emmeline notes that;

 

‘The impact of a clear vision can plant the seed of change to make a more sustainable future. Through cross-fertilization and careful nurturing, the impact can be wider than anything you initially intended. ‘The path to a more beautiful world can come from vast plans and small gestures… as long as the strategy bears the needs of future visitors in mind’ (McDonough and Braungart, 2015, p.180). It can be insightful to seek outside the social innovation paradigms for tested examples that can inform models for success in the future.’

TED PhD Researcher Exhibiting at Experiencing Change / Changing Experience

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Bridget Harvey is exhibiting in Experiencing Change / Changing Experience at ONCA Gallery, Brighton from 27th July –5th August. Her piece the Spelman Cups (2016) explores Elizabeth Spelman’s definitions of non-repairers and our complex relationship with repair.

 

The exhibition investigates a world where environment and society is in a state of flux with large, and sometimes devastating changes predicted for the future. Change can seem inevitable or out of our hands, so how much influence do we have on change? Do we just react to the changes we experience or can we intervene?

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International artists from the e:collective launch their debut exhibition of new work exploring relationships with change on a social, economic, environmental and personal level. The exhibition will challenge, enact, refresh and stimulate our perceptions and thoughts on change, and will be viewed alongside current research by scientists at the Global Sustainability Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge.

 

During the exhibition, artists in residence Mark Vennegoor and Aurora Sciabarra will each develop new work in the gallery, inviting visitors to participate in their practice. The project is devised by lead artist Valerie Furnham in collaboration with researcher Dr. Rosie Robison [GSI], and with the support of Arts Council England, ONCA Gallery and the Global Sustainability Institute.

 

PREVIEW | Tuesday 26th July 6:30pm – 9pm. Please RSVP to valerie.furnham@gmail.com

 

Address
ONCA Gallery | 14 St. George’s Place, Brighton BN1 4GB

 

Date
27th July –5th August 2016

TED PhD Researcher to Speak at Design + Research + Society

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TED PhD researcher Miriam Ribul has been selected to present her practice-based PhD research at the PhD By Design event at the Design + Research + Society (DRS) Conference this week. Miriam’s practice-based research is at the intersection of material science and design research. She is exploring how design can offer new insights for textiles when designers intervene with materials; not in their finished form, but in the science laboratory. The aim of this PhD research is to develop a design-led paradigm for textile manufacturing in the context of a 21st century circular economy.

 

Design + Research + Society (DRS) Conference runs on the 28th – 30th June at the University of Brighton. The event celebrates the Design Research Society in its 50th Anniversary year. In connection to the DRS conference, this event will explore what the future holds for design research and how this future is being enacted through practice-based PhD design projects right now. The main questions that the conference seek to explore are:

 

  • How do current PhDs in Design, frame and address the societal problems that face us?
  • In what ways are practice-based PhDs influencing ideas about Design and working as a designer?
  • How does current practice-based design research contribute to re-shaping our lives in more responsible, meaningful, and open ways?

TED PhD researcher to Speak at TRAID Event

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On Thursday next week TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey will be speaking at the eighth #TRAIDtalks along with two other leading voices with unique viewpoints on repair in the community. She will be speaking on the landscape and politics of repair-making, from a material and social point of view.

 

The other speakers for the evening are Janet Gunter, co-founder of the Restart Project and blogger Jen Gale from My Make Do And Mend Life.  The three are part of a passionate network of active citizens making headway with the repair movement – sharing skills to benefit the community with an aim to tackle waste and counter over-consumption and working to inspire a repair revolution with wellbeing, skill-sharing, community and concern for the environment at the very root.  To revive the forgotten art of repairing things and improving relationships with ‘stuff’, this #TRAIDtalks will involve story-telling and sharing case studies to inspire positive change within communities.

 

TRAID is a fashion reuse charity working to stop clothes from being thrown away.  They turn clothes waste into funds and resources to reduce the environmental and social impacts of our textile use. You can support TRAID’s work by bringing a bag of your unwanted wearable clothes, shoes and accessories for reuse and reselling through their charity shops.

 

Spaces are limited so please book your  free ticket in advance to avoid disappointment. Suggested donation on the door: £5 to support Ziferblat, a shared community space in Old Street.

 

 

Date:
Thursday 23rd of June, 18.30-20.00

 

Location:
Ziferblat, First Floor
388 Old Street
London, EC1V 9LT

Blue Jumper

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TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey is exhibiting her Blue Jumper (2012) in an exhibition of “thoughtfully mended textiles” called …by a thread… at Gawthorpe Hall, until 19th June 2016.

The exhibition aims to explore ideas around mending, after a year of building renovation and repair at the hall itself. From the curator:

“While the stonework within the Hall was being mended – quite invisibly – we became interested in repair which did the opposite. We started looking for examples of mending which were visible and actually made a feature of wear and tear. We discovered that with textile items, repair can be storytelling, creative and commemorative. It can add something extra and bring new meaning and emotion to an object. It can tell us more about people, history, memories and lives.”

The artefacts exhibited in …by a thread… all display thoughtful and careful repairs, and include Karen Suzuki’s rescued teddy, Jacy Wall’s Japanase boro jacket, David Worsley’s darned jeans, Angela Maddock’s repaired Wrangler jacket and Jenni Steele’s 1930s nurse’s apron, along with Claire Wellesley-Smith’s Japanese boro bloomers and Coreen Cottam’s family quilt. Each comes with a story written by the lender, explaining why the process and act of repair is significant to them.

About Blue Jumper

‘I consider Blue Jumper, a heavily darned navy blue jumper, to be a performative artwork that I wear and work on. I found it in pristine condition, in a charity shop off Old Street, London, now Blue Jumper is heavily darned yet still worn. As environmentalist I am anti-waste, and I wear only second-hand wool. When moths ate Blue Jumper, I continued wearing it.

This garment can be considered disobedient, and it certainly has a disobedient wearer. My stitched intervention displays my politics: my slogan not shouted but darned. Blue Jumper is personal, political, active and rebellious.

I find myself resilient against pressure to buy new: I can, I will, I am, through choice and necessity, wearing, repairing and re-wearing. In celebration of resistance and autonomy, like Plutarch’s Ship of Theseus, I will keep repairing Blue Jumper until all is repair, and beyond.’

The Craft Readers

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TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey and CSM research student Giorgio Salani have started a reading group, The Craft Readers at UAL.  The name is in reference to The Craft Reader, edited by Glenn Adamson (Berg, 2009), the writings in which cover many of the different areas of craft.

While Bridget and Giorgio’s material disciplines differ, their reading interests have many crossovers, and so they decide to delve into these more deeply by starting a discussion and reading group for craft researchers, or artists, designers and researchers interested in the craft discourses, inviting postgrad students from all UAL colleges and courses.

The group meets monthly and they have previously discussed texts by authors such as Julia Bryan-Wilson and Tim Ingold.  They also meet for exhibition visits and corresponding discussion sessions. The texts and visits are proposed and decided upon ahead of time by the group, and anything can be suggested.  Their aims are to develop a strong network of craft researchers within UAL, publish a proposed lexicon for craft meanings now and to build a blog site. This will be a publishing platform for those involved in The Craft Readers for reviewed position/opinion/essay pieces, exhibitions, book write ups and photo essays as well as to act as a record of what is being discussed or read.

The Peoples Climate March

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TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey was at the Peoples Climate March, London, on Sunday 28th November.  She was marching as part of a Mending Bloc with TRAID and The Restart Project, carrying her Mend More Jumper.  An estimated 40,000 people joined the London march, marking the start of the climate talks in Paris.

‪The Restart Project is a London-based social enterprise that encourages and empowers people to use their electronics longer, by sharing repair and maintenance skills.  TRAID turn clothes waste into funds and resources to reduce the environmental and social impacts of our clothes, taking a circular and sustainable approach to the problems of clothes waste tackling disposal, production and consumption by increasing textile reuse and funding projects to improve working conditions in the clothing industry.

‪Last week was #secondhandfirst which Bridget began by helping facilitate a textile mending workshop at The Big Fix, organised by Hackney Fixers and The Restart Project.  On Thursday night she helped at another textile repair workshop, this time a community event at Fabrications, Broadway Market.

‪The Mend More Jumper is part of her practice based AHRC PhD project positing repair as a pathway to sustainability and resilience.

‪www.peoplesclimate.org/
www.traid.org.uk/
ww.therestartproject.org/
www.theguardian.com/environment/cop-21-un-climate-change-conference-paris
www.sustainablehackney.org.uk/events/hackney-fixers-the-big-fix
www.fabrications1.co.uk/
www.bridgetharvey.co.uk

 

TED PhD student to present at International Conference

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Emmeline Child will be presenting at the 90th Textile Institute World Conference hosted by the Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants (INF&MP) in Poznan, Poland, in April 2016. The aim of the conference will be to establish international interdisciplinary cooperation in various fields of science, research and economy that are linked by textile technology in its broadest sense.

Emmeline will be presenting ‘An auto ethnographic review of 48 pieces from the Emmeline 4 Re collections: Defining barriers and gains leading to successful upcycling’. Using pieces from upcycled collections between 2004 and 2009, the review was carried out at product level and sought to understand and reflect on strengths and weaknesses of the collections. Working through pieces chronologically, Emmeline made observations based on material selection, design, manufacture and ease of sortation, in order to draw insights into potential successful models and methods for upcycling in the future.

This is part of Emmeline’s wider TED PhD research titled, Scaling-Up Upcycling: Designing Creative Models for Increasing the Rates of the Commercial Reuse of Post Consumer Textile Waste.

 

Green Week: Fixing Fashion | Repair is the New Black

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Repair is the new black!  For UAL Green Week 2015, TED PhD researcher Bridget Harvey invites you to experiment with mending your clothes and other textiles: customising them and fixing damage through patching, darning and adding new buttons.

In the UK we send over £200m of clothes to landfill each year. Mending can help keep these textiles in circulation, and help us love our clothes for longer. Learn hands-on skills for clothes mending – darning, patching and other small and simple mends. All the techniques can be done by hand, no previous skills or experience necessary.

Along with plenty of enthusiasm, all you need to bring with you are scrap fabrics or clothes with holes, stains, missing buttons etc!

Taking place at various College locations, many Green Week events encourage positive action. London College of Fashion is inviting staff and students to get involved in planting a new hedgerow habitat, while the cross-UAL ‘Waste Off Challenge’ (developed and part-funded by LCC) will see students transform waste materials into useful new creations. Central Saint Martins is offering students a workshop on mending clothes and fabrics, and a toolkit that promises to show how to make projects more sustainable. Camberwell College of Arts has set up the ‘Re-use Exchange’ which allows students to drop off excess materials from old projects to be re-used by others.

Fixing Fashion | Repair is the New Black

Friday 13 February 11:00 – 16:00
1st Floor – D1 Corridor, Central Saint Martins